Savings Is Not A Cost

Don Boudreaux draws my attention to an opinion piece at the Washington Post written by Robert Samuelson.  Don addresses one concern Samuelson has, but I want to address another, more fundamental point.

Samuelson writes (emphasis added):

A simple example shows why the theory works. Consider (hypothetically) widgets. Assume that new technologies cut widget production costs by 20%. These savings must go somewhere, and the chances are that they will be spent, thereby creating new jobs. The major candidates to receive the windfall are: (a) consumers, who could benefit from lower widget prices; (b) widget workers, whose salaries might be boosted; or (c) the shareholders of widget makers, which might raise dividends or build factories.

This logic could be thwarted if the windfall were saved and not spent.

Strictly speaking, this is not true.  If the windfall were saved and not spent, that does not mean that benefits do not occur.  Savings are economically productive, too.  Even if 100% of the windfall were saved, that would mean there are more funds for investment: housing loans, car loans, retirement, business loans, etc.  An increase in savings would help boost the economy, too.

Let’s do some thinking on the margin.  Let’s say that the windfall results in $1m saved.  Taking Samuelson’s argument above at face value, it’d mean that the $1m saved was a loss for the economy.  However, that $1m is loaned out to a new business owner who uses it to build his building, stock his store, and, once up and running hires more workers and produces more wealth for his community and the world.  The economy certainly has benefited.  I would suggest the following edit to Dr. Samuelson’s paragraph (bold and italicized part is my writing):

A simple example shows why the theory works. Consider (hypothetically) widgets. Assume that new technologies cut widget production costs by 20%. These savings must go somewhere, and the chances are that they will be spent, thereby creating new jobs. The major candidates to receive the windfall are: (a) consumers, who could benefit from lower widget prices; (b) widget workers, whose salaries might be boosted; (c) the shareholders of widget makers, which might raise dividends or build factories; or (d) borrowers/investors who now have a larger pool of loanable funds from which to draw, if some of the windfall is saved.

This logic could be thwarted if the windfall were saved and not spent.