The Hayek Memorial Pathway

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The picture above is what I like to call the Hayek Memorial Pathway located on GMU’s Fairfax campus.  This pathway is the result of thousands of students deciding to go the shortest path rather than the long paved path.  In other words, this path is a spontaneous order; the result of human action but no one person planned such a path.

Surprise!

At Cafe Hayek, Don Boudreaux has a blog post discussing the rather frequent argument used by some protectionists who object to foreigners owning American assets.  Don writes:

One of the facts that I pointed out [in Don’s recent debate with Ian Fletcher] is that a U.S. trade deficit is good for the U.S. insofar as such a deficit means that capital is flowing into the U.S. and creates new businesses (or bolsters existing businesses).  Think, for example, of BMW’s factory in Greer, South Carolina, or of any of the many Ikea stores across the United States.

In reply, Fletcher agreed that such investment is productive, and even that it’s beneficial for Americans.  “However,” he replied (and here I quote from memory), “it would be even better if those assets were owned by Americans.”

The core error in Fletcher’s reply is the assumption that the productive assets that are brought into being by foreign investment would exist in the absence of foreign investment.  Fletcher assumes, for example, that the successful Ikea store in Dale City, Virginia, would exist in the absence of Ikea’s decision to build and operate a store there.  Fletcher assumes, in other words, that the ownership of an asset is economically distinct from the creation of an asset.  But this assumption is plainly mistaken.  Nothing prevented Americans from building a large furniture (or other kind of) store on that very location before Ikea built its store there – nothing, that is, other than the failure of any Americans to have the vision or the willingness to do so.  Ikea’s entrepreneurial vision and willingness to take the risk of building a store in Dale City added tothe capital stock in America (and in the world).

To build upon Don’s point:

People like Fletcher treat assets and resources as if they are mana from Heaven, that these factories and stores and the like just fall to the Earth, waiting to be claimed by whoever walks by.  But goods and services are brought into existence and traded through human action. It’s man, not God, that transforms and produces. God just gave us the faculties to do so.

However, there is also a crucial element of what Israel Kirzner called “surprise” needed.  That is, being aware when an opportunity presents itself.  Allow me to explain via metaphor:

Two shoe salesmen land in a foreign country. Both notice no one in this country wears shoes. The first calls back to headquarters: “I’m headed home. There are no sales opportunities here. No one wears shoes!” The second calls back to headquarters: “Send me more people. There are lots of sales opportunities here. No one wears shoes!”

The point of this story is that entrepreneurial activity includes “surprise,” that is: being aware of an opportunity that presents itself even when not actively searching for it.  One of the salesmen, the one who thought no opportunity existed, had no such element of surprise.  The other did.

There’s no reason to assume that if Ikea hadn’t shown up, someone else would have. This isn’t a “search cost” thing (ie, other people did not simply look hard enough and Ikea just looked harder/longer), but rather an entrepreneurial surprise thing. Ikea spotted an opportunity and invested. It’s probable no one else would have spotted (or, at least spotted at the same time) this opportunity.

But let’s say more. Let’s say that some American firm did spot the same opportunity at the same time and were competing against Ikea for the same resources (land, labor, etc). Would it be safe to say that the community would be better off if the assets were owned by the American firm rather than Ikea? Not necessarily. Given that Ikea won the bidding war, that probably means Ikea had a higher value on the resources than the other firm. This, in turn, means that Ikea can likely produce more value out of the resource, which means providing value to the consumers of furniture. By being more efficient (that is, using fewer inputs to achieve the same or greater outputs), Ikea produces more value for the community than the other firm that lost the bid.

Economic growth occurs through the mechanisms of discovery and surprise (a la Kirzner) and resources going to their most valued uses.  We cannot take for granted either one of these processes.

What I’ve Been Reading

The following is a short list of some of the non-technical books I have been reading over the past few months:

The Theory of Moral Sentiments (Adam Smith): A classic of classical liberal philosophy

The Man and the Statesman (Frederic Bastiat): The collected correspondence and several articles by the noted French economist and statesman

The Firm, the Market, and the Law (Ronald Coase): A collection of the famous essays and notes/responses by Coase on their receptions and interpretations

The Calculus of Consent (James Buchanan & Gordon Tullock): The foundations of public choice theory

Human Action (Ludwig von Mises): A classic work on economics and human interaction

Free Market Environmentalism (Donald Leal and Terry Anderson): Exploring environmental issues through the eyes of price theory

Governing the Commons (Elinor Ostrom): How people come together to solve commons problems

Order without Law (Robert Ellickson): A similar story to Ostrom: how people come together to deal with externalities without the state

De Officiis (Cicero, translated by Benjamin Newton): a classic of moral philosophy

 

Optimal Tariffs and Blackboard Economics

Don Boudreaux favorably quotes Doug Irwin over at Cafe Hayek.  Below is a slightly edited comment I left:

What Iriwn, like Hayek and Coase before him, points out I think is just brilliant: the scarcityists’ arguments are one long exercise in begging the question. They’re assuming they have the very knowledge they’re trying to show they can acquire. Yes, if one just happened to know the complete set of preferences and demand curves for all people in the nation, then one could create an optimal tariff or policy for that given moment in time. But it’s in getting that knowledge where the trick lies.

Note that the key word here is “knowledge,” not “information.” You don’t need data points to feed into a machine, but precise observations about the nature and time and place of each individual, observations the individual himself does not necessarily know. Collecting these necessary observations are impossible.

But there is another thing to keep in mind: Bastiat. Let’s grant the scarcityist’s assumptions and say we can set an optimal tariff policy. Such a policy is optimal in name only; it’s optimal only through incomplete accounting. It’s optimal only from the point of view of the country levying the tariff. But economics is not about only looking at one person in one time period (the seen). We must look at all people over all time periods (the unseen). An optimal tariff in the US may temporarily raise US net welfare, but at the same time, the world as a whole is made worse off. A poorer world means fewer buyers of US products and fewer sellers of goods to the US (exacerbated by the tariff). A poorer world also means increased instability, and likely more war. Both these effects will rebound on the US, leading to a poorer US as well over time. In short, even if we grant the assumptions of the scarcityists, the outcome from tariffs, when explored across all people in all time periods, is still negative.